C++ has several special member functions that are defined by the compiler even if not defined by the user. These special member functions are the default constructor, the copy constructor, the copy assignment operator, the move constructor, the move assignment operator, and the destructor. However, there are many rules for what is defined and in which circumstances. For instance, if no special member function is defined by the user then all of them are implicitly defined by the compiler. On the other hand, if a copy constructor or copy assignment operator is defined by the user, then the move constructor and move assignment operator are not defined by the compiler. To make it easier to comprehend all the rules, the following table describes what is defined by the compiler based on what is defined by the user.

Read More C++ rules for special member functions

Partial function application is the process of taking a function with a number of arguments, fixing (or binding) some of its arguments and producing a new function with a smaller number of arguments. In C++, this can be achieved with std::bind() that generates a forwarding call wrapper for a callable object, and the placeholder objects from the std::placeholders namespace that are used for binding arguments to the callable object.

Read More Partial function applications

In my previous article, C++17 removed and deprecated features, I presented a list of the most important features that were either removed or deprecated in C++17. When you’re using deprecated features, compilers warn you about that. In this article, I will show how you can silence these warnings when using Visual Studio 2017.

Read More Visual Studio warning macros for C++17 deprecated features

Along with the new features added to the language and the standard library in C++17, there are also existing features that have been either removed (after being deprecated in a previous version) or deprecated so they would be removed sometime in the future. Although not complete, the following tables list the most important of these removed or deprecated features.

Read More C++17 removed and deprecated features

Here is my list of good reads from May: Non-Ownership and Generic Programming and Regular types, oh my! Using C++17 std::optional Error Handling and std::optional std::accumulate vs. std::reduce How to Make SFINAE Pretty – Part 1: What SFINAE Brings to Code How to Make SFINAE Pretty – Part 2: the Hidden Beauty of SFINAE How…

Read More May good reads

Transform-reduce is a pattern in which a set of data is first modified by applying a transformation on each of the elements and then it is reduced to a single value. In C++, this can be implemented straightforwardly with std::transform and std::accumulate. In C++17, an alternative for std::accumulate is available; std::reduce sums a range of elements just like std::accumulate, except that it does so out of order. That means you cannot use it with operators that are not communicative or associative (including overloads of operator+ that don’t exhibit these properties). On the other hand, there is yet another algorithm called std::transform_reduce that applies a functor to all the elements of a range and then reduces them, all in an out of order manner. And then, there are also parallel versions of these algorithms. In this post, I will try to compare the performance of these possible alternatives for implementing transform-reduce.

Read More Transform and reduce alternatives