A C++20 coroutine example

One of the most important new features in the C++20 is coroutines. A coroutine is a function that has the ability to be suspended and resumed. A function becomes a coroutine if it uses any of the following:

  • the co_await operator to suspend execution until resumed
  • the co_return keyword to complete execution and optionally return a value
  • the co_yield keyword to suspend execution and return a value

A coroutine must also have a return type that satisfies some requirements. However, the C++20 standard, only defines a framework for the execution of coroutines, but does not define any coroutine types satisfying such requirements. That means, we need to either write our own or rely on 3rd party libraries for this. In this post, I’ll show how to write some simple examples using the cppcoro library.

Highlights from Microsoft Build 2020

The Microsoft Build 2020 event happened this week, and, unlike all previous editions, it was a digital event only. Moreover, it was also free, so everybody could attend the 48 hours marathon. Microsoft made a lot of announcements and released various products and services for Windows, Azure, Office, Visual Studio, Edge, and more. In this post, I will summarize the things that I found the most interesting for me.

Modules in Clang 11

In my previous post, I wrote about the support for C++20 modules in Visual Studio 2019 16.5. VC++ is not the only major compiler that has experimental support for modules. Clang has its own implementation, although only partial. In this post, I will discuss the support available in Clang 11. You can check the current status here.

Modules in VC++ 2019 16.5

Modules are one of the bigest changes in C++20 but the compilers’ support for them is a work in progress. The Visual C++ compiler has experimental support for modules that can be enabled by using the /experimental:module and /std:c++latest switches. In this post, I will walk through the core of the functionality available in Visual…

My book “Learn C# Programming” has been published

I am pleased to announce that my new book, Learn C# Programming, that I co-authored together with Raffaele Rialdi (Microsoft MVP/speaker) and Ankit Sharma (C# Corner MVP/Google Dev Expert/speaker) has been published at PacktPub. The book can be ordered at PacktPub and (soon) Amazon (ISBN 9781789805864).

This book is primarily intended for people that want to learn to program in C# for .NET. This book will not teach you the basics of programming but it will teach you the C# language from the very basics to the most advanced topics, and to the latest in C# 8, which is the current version of the language. However, if you are an experienced C# programmer, but want to learn the latest features from C# 8 or how to work with .NET Core, target multiple platforms, and migrate from .NET Framework, this book should be handy for you too.

C++20 atomic_ref

C++11 provides the atomic operations library that features classes and functions that enable us to perform atomic operations using lock-free mechanisms. There are primarily two class templates in this library, std::atomic and std::atomic_flag. The latter, which defines an atomic boolean type, is guaranteed to always be lock-free and is implemented using the lock-free atomic CPU instructions. The former however, may actually be implemented using mutexes or other locking operations. In this article, we will look at a new class template, introduced in C++20, std::atomic_ref.

Using Microsoft Edge in a native Windows desktop app – part 2

In the second part of this series, we will see how to use the WebView2 control in a C++ Windows desktop application. We will use a single document interface MFC application that features a toolbar where you can specify an address to navigate to and buttons to navigate back and forward as well as reloading the current page or stopping navigation.

Using Microsoft Edge in a native Windows desktop app – part 1

Earlier this month, Microsoft has released the new version of its Edge browser, based on the Chromium project. The new browser works on Windows 10, Windows 8.x, and Windows 7, as well as macOS, iOS, and Android. If your application display web content, you can use the new Edge browser as the rendering engine. This is made possible through the Microsoft Edge WebView2 control, currently in developer preview. In this series, I will show how you can do this in a C++ Windows desktop application.