.NET

Here is my list of good reads from May: Non-Ownership and Generic Programming and Regular types, oh my! Using C++17 std::optional Error Handling and std::optional std::accumulate vs. std::reduce How to Make SFINAE Pretty – Part 1: What SFINAE Brings to Code How to Make SFINAE Pretty – Part 2: the Hidden Beauty of SFINAE How…

Read More May good reads

You may have multiple versions of the .NET framework installed and used on your machine. The framework has two components: the set of assemblies that provide functionalities for your application, and the common language runtime (CLR) that handles the execution of the application. These two components are versioned separately. If you what to see what…

Read More How to determine what CLR versions are installed using C++

Visual Studio 2017 Enterprise provides a feature called Live Unit Testing that enables developers to see live how changing C# and VB.NET code affects its corresponding unit tests. Among its features, it includes showing coverage information in the editor as you type, integration with the Test Explorer, including/excluding targeted test methods or projects for large…

Read More TDD with Live Unit Testing in Visual Studio 2017

The C# Interactive window has been made available again in Visual Studio with the first update to 2015, this time as a REPL window. You can type or paste and execute C# code, and it includes support for adding references to external DLLs and using namespaces. The window is intended for rapid prototyping C# code.…

Read More C# Interactive Window in Visual Studio 2015 Update 1

Visual Studio 2015 is out and comes with lots of new features and improvements (see details here) but it also surprised me with what I call a demoting of C++ again to a second-class citizen, after some years when it looked like it regained importance at Microsoft. I’m saying Microsoft has demoted C++ because they…

Read More Microsoft made C++ a second-class citizen in Visual Studio 2015

Windows 8 features a Settings charm to display both application (the top part) and system (the bottom part) settings (you get it from swiping from the side of the screen). The system provides two entry points, Permissions and Rate and Review, the later only for applications installed through the store. You can customize the settings…

Read More Working with the Settings Charm for Windows 8.1 Store Applications