Using Microsoft Edge in a native Windows desktop app – part 4

In the previous articles, we learned how to perform navigation in a Windows desktop application and how navigation events work. However, until recently, it was not possible to perform POST or GET request using custom headers or content. This feature was added in version 705.50. In this fourth article of the series, we will look in detail at how to perform POST requests with custom headers and content.

Modernizing legacy code

In the past decade and a half I’ve been working with large legacy code bases started in early ’90s. Therefore, I had to deal with lots of code using old styles and conventions such raw pointers, void pointers, declaring all variables before using them, public data members accessed from everywhere, and many others. I believe in change and therefore I’m trying to make as many changes as possible. Of course, this is not always possible, or desirable (due to various constraints). Moreover, nobody will stop a large project for months or years to modernize the code. However, applying small but incremental changes is always possible, and over time, large code-bases can improve. This is a strategy I’m constantly applying to parts of code that I have to modify. In this blog post I will be listing a series of improvements you can do with old C++ code in order to modernize and improve it.

The little functions that matter

Starting with C++20, some very useful functions for searching have been added to some standard containers, such as std::map, std::set, and std::string. These have been required for a long time and it’s good to see that the committee finally agreed upon their value. I hope this is the beginning of some wonderful additions.

Why I like C++ attributes

Attributes are an underrated feature of the C++ language, in my opinion. I am saying this because I rarely see attributes used in code or samples featured in articles, videos, or talks. Although some of the standard attributes are targeted towards library implementers or address a limited number of scenarios (such as [[no_unique_address]], [[noreturn]], or [[carries_dependency]]), there are several that are quite useful in many situations. I refer here to [[nodiscard]], [[maybe_unused]], and [[deprecated]], which are the attributes I will talk about in this post.

C++20 books

The C++20 standard is complete and is supposed to be published later this year after the voting of the final draft takes place. However, there are books already with C++20 content. In this blog post I present a list of them. The C++ Standard Library, 3rd edition – Rainer Grimm Rainer is an author, consultant,…

No more plain old data

When working in C++, you often hear about POD types (which stands for Plain Old Data). PODs are useful for communicating with code written in other programming languages (such as C or .NET languages). They can also be copied using memcpy (which is important because this is a fast, low-level function that provides performance benefits), and have other characteristics that are key for some scenarios. However, the new C++20 standard has deprecated the concept of POD types in favor of two more refined categories, which are trivial and standard-layout types. In this post, I will discuss what these categories are and when to use instead of POD.

A C++20 coroutine example

One of the most important new features in the C++20 is coroutines. A coroutine is a function that has the ability to be suspended and resumed. A function becomes a coroutine if it uses any of the following:

  • the co_await operator to suspend execution until resumed
  • the co_return keyword to complete execution and optionally return a value
  • the co_yield keyword to suspend execution and return a value

A coroutine must also have a return type that satisfies some requirements. However, the C++20 standard, only defines a framework for the execution of coroutines, but does not define any coroutine types satisfying such requirements. That means, we need to either write our own or rely on 3rd party libraries for this. In this post, I’ll show how to write some simple examples using the cppcoro library.

Highlights from Microsoft Build 2020

The Microsoft Build 2020 event happened this week, and, unlike all previous editions, it was a digital event only. Moreover, it was also free, so everybody could attend the 48 hours marathon. Microsoft made a lot of announcements and released various products and services for Windows, Azure, Office, Visual Studio, Edge, and more. In this post, I will summarize the things that I found the most interesting for me.