Using Microsoft Edge in a native Windows desktop app – part 2

In the second part of this series, we will see how to use the WebView2 control in a C++ Windows desktop application. We will use a single document interface MFC application that features a toolbar where you can specify an address to navigate to and buttons to navigate back and forward as well as reloading the current page or stopping navigation.

Using Microsoft Edge in a native Windows desktop app – part 1

Earlier this month, Microsoft has released the new version of its Edge browser, based on the Chromium project. The new browser works on Windows 10, Windows 8.x, and Windows 7, as well as macOS, iOS, and Android. If your application display web content, you can use the new Edge browser as the rendering engine. This is made possible through the Microsoft Edge WebView2 control, currently in developer preview. In this series, I will show how you can do this in a C++ Windows desktop application.

Troubles with Windows SDK

I recently installed a fresh copy of Visual Studio 2017 on a new machine and went on to build several projects some of them being VC++. The trouble was that I immediately run into a problem (actually the first problem was that MFC & ATL were missing because I forgot to check that in the list of Individual components so I had to install them separately). The problem was an error with a missing new.h header:

1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio\2017\enterprise\vc\tools\msvc\14.15.26726\atlmfc\include\afx.h(62): fatal error C1083: Cannot open include file: 'new.h': No such file or directory

Version history of VC++, MFC and ATL

I have tried to assemble together information about the Visual C++ releases, the compiler and the frameworks (MFC and ATL). You can find these on many places, but it is often incomplete or focused on something particular (Visual Studio, C++ compiler, framework, etc.). The table below is the result of this effort. It is incomplete…

Dynamic Dialog Layout for MFC in Visual C++ 2015

In Visual Studio 2015 MFC comes with a new features (something that has rarely happen in recent years): support for dynamic dialog layout. That means library support for moving and resizing controls on a dialog. In this article I will show how this feature works. Suppose we have the following dialog: What we want is…

MFC Collection Utilities library

This project has been moved to GitHub. New location: https://github.com/mariusbancila/mfccollectionutilities C++11 has provided support for range-based for loops. They allow iterating over the elements of a range without using an index.

However, if you try the following MFC code you get some errors because the compiler is looking for a begin() and end() function…